Alfonso Faustino: Motorola CP200 VHF 4-channel Transceiver: 146-174 MHz (K6ASF)

In my previous BLOG, I mentioned I really dig my Yaesu VX-6R hand-held transceiver and my Yaesu FT-857D mobile portable transceiver.  As I got to know more and more HAM operators, I got more and more exposed to other HAM products.

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I met a group of HAM operators that are passionate Motorola transceiver users — in fact, they consider themselves Motorola snobs — they only purchase Motorola stuff and are not interested nor impressed by other brands, like Yaesu.  I understand the affinity and loyalty they have to Motorola — after all, Motorola is the Ferrari of communications equipment for the military, law enforcement officers, construction companies, federal government employees, and small, medium, and large business, and Fortune 500 corporations.

Motorola has a legacy of quality products from kiddie walkie-talkies to mobile phones to complex communications systems not available to the public.  All their products are made with quality stuff and meant to last and endure lifestyles of all types of users.

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When I was racing around in my Ferraris, my group purchased the Motorola CP200 VHF 4-channel transceiver with four specific frequencies programmed just for our Ferrari group: simplex: 146-174 MHz.

After I left the group, I put my transceiver away and never saw it again. In fact, when I moved out of my family house to my newly constructed Tuscany-style home at the Top Of Nob Hill, I was gonna throw my Motorola CP200 VHF 4-channel transceiver into the garbage with the other stuff I collected over the 20+ years.  I’m so glad I kept it and brought it to my new home.

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After I got into HAM network, I wondered if I could use my Motorola CP200 VHF 4-channel transceiver to hit a repeater or chat with other HAM operators on simplex.  So, I pulled it out of my closet.  It, of course, like everything else I own, was in perfect condition — not a scratch or scuff mark, as you can see in the pictures.

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HAM operators that have seen it, were surprised and called it a virgin.  Given that I’ve only used it five time in my entire life, it definitely looked like it came straight of the box — yeah, a virgin in that way.

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So, I tried to send a signal out, and, of course, it didn’t work; because, the frequencies were exclusive just for my Ferrari group.  So, I did some research and with the help of Ryan (KG6CWE) and Desmond (KC6VHG), I contacted a Motorola authorized dealer and brought my transceiver to get programmed with the repeaters and simplex frequencies I use.

 

Now, I have four repeaters on my Motorola CP200 VHF 4-channel transceiver, and I made contact with an Oakland repeater (ORCA) while I was walking around in San Francisco.

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Of course, I still have an affinity with my Yaesu transceivers — the only thing I’ve done is added to my collection of HAM transceivers — much like the same way I did with my two Ferraris.

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I’m so happy with my now civilian Motorola CP200 VHF 4-channel transceiver; and, now, I’m a Motorola groupie.  I’m looking out for a new Motorola XTS5000 — any leads?

Check 6!

/s/ Alfonso Faustino (K6ASF)

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