Alfonso Faustino: Eddie Bauer: PCB: Portable Communications Bag (K6ASF)

I had this Eddie Bauer document bag for over 20 years.  I don’t think Eddie Bauer sells this bag anymore.  I really dig this bag.  During my time in Corporate America, this Eddie Bauer document bag was my primary work-bag, carrying work-files, laptop, pens, and mobile phone.

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Recently, after many years of storage, I pulled it out of my closet and re-purposed it; hence, I made it my Portable Communications (Comm) Bag, hereinafter, PCB, which contains my Yaesu FT-857D and all the necessary stuff to get my comm gear up and running.

Unlike my bug-out pack, my PCB is not something I carry with me everyday.  All the stuff I need for an emergency catastrophe is contained in my bug-out pack, including my emergency comm tool: Yaesu VX-6R.

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When I go out in the field for my portable comm activities, my Yaesu FT-857D is powered by my portable rechargeable 12V LiFePO4 Battery made by Bioenno Power.

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I also carry the Bioenno foldable solar panel and Bioenno solar controller to charge the 12V LiFePO4 Battery.

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After I’m done, I pack all my gear up into my PCC or PCB.

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When using my PCB, I keep my comm gear in sealed in zip lock bags just in case water penetrates my portable comm bag.  My PCC is a Pelican 1520, and it is water-resistant and submersible; hence, I don’t need plastic bags for my HAM comm gear when stored in the PCC.

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As mentioned in my previous BLOG, I like bags and back-packs that blend in with civilian life.  I don’t like military tactical bags and back-packs because of all the attention they draw.

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I like to blend in and not be a mark.  I don’t want anyone to know I’m carrying communications gear while walking on streets of San Francisco, New York City’s Manhattan, or Beverly Hills’s, Rodeo Drive during an emergency or civil catastrophe.

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I schedule time every single day to learn and practice using my HAM transceivers and learning about the HAM networks; so, I can properly communicate with other HAM operators.  Protocols must be followed; and, each repeater has a different protocol for the actual programing of the transceivers, as well as communicating over the radio waves.

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 After I’m done practicing and learning for the day or night, I pack up my comm gear into their respective containers.

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I placed foam cushions in both the boxes to prevent the radio’s body and the radio’s control face-plate from sliding all around while I’m on the move.

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These containers are the perfect size for my PCB.

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I place the two containers, battery, and all the wires into my PCB, and I store it away until the next practice day or emergency.

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I like to travel light; hence, my bug-out pack and my PCB have only the essentials comm gear items I need to boot up my Yaesu FT-875D, send out a radio wave signal, make contact, and coordinate help with other HAM operators during an emergency situation. Unlike most HAM operators, I don’t lug around a multi-piece antenna, yards and yards of coaxial cable, various meters, nor multiple car batteries in my PCB; I keep my PCB very simple.

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I enjoy being portable, and my PCB makes being portable easy for me — especially, if I wanna HAM it up while looking at my view of the San Francisco skyline from my penthouse deck.

For heavier duty and longer travels, I move my HAM comm gear into my PCC (Portable Communications Case).

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I designed my HAM comm gear to fit my on-the-move life-style; so, I have a carry-system for all my venues.

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Check 6!

/s/ Alfonso Faustino (K6ASF)

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